• FORUM NAME - If you are a COG Member and your user name does not match your name in the old forum or you just want a new one, you can now change it on your own. Read the Details Here

  • If you are a current COG Member or Forum Subscriber and this is your first visit to our new site and forum, please go to www.concour.org and follow the instructions at the top of the page to activate your account and gain access to your site and forum.
  • Can't post after logging to the forum for the first time... Try Again - If you can't post in the forum, sign out of both the membership site and the forum and log in again. Make sure your COG membership is active and your browser allow cookies. If you still can't post, contact the COG IT guy at IT@Concours.org.
  • IF YOU GET 404 ERROR: This may be due to using a link in a post from prior to the web migration. Content was brought over from the old forum as is, but the links may be in error. If the link contains "cog-online.org" it is an old link and will not work.

Reading for pleasure- what are you reading now?

Conrad

Street Cruiser
Forum Subscriber

The President Is Missing​

by Bill Clinton and James Patterson

9781538713846_p0_v3_s600x595.jpg
 

Strawboss

Member
Member
"A Column of Fire", by Ken Follett, the third book of the "Kingsbridge Trilogy" now situated in 1558 follows 2 families on opposite sides when the Protestant Reformation is sweeping England and France and people are being killed because of what they believe in. Powerful stuff.
 

ron203

Southeast Area Director
Member
The Apocalypse Troll by David Weber (oldie scifi from the basement library).
 

ron203

Southeast Area Director
Member
"A Column of Fire", by Ken Follett, the third book of the "Kingsbridge Trilogy" now situated in 1558 follows 2 families on opposite sides when the Protestant Reformation is sweeping England and France and people are being killed because of what they believe in. Powerful stuff.
Good series.
 

Daboo

Moderator
Staff member
Member
I'm reading the second letter to Timothy...

2 Timothy 3:1-5 1 But mark this: There will be terrible times in the last days. 2 People will be lovers of themselves, lovers of money, boastful, proud, abusive, disobedient to their parents, ungrateful, unholy, 3 without love, unforgiving, slanderous, without self-control, brutal, not lovers of the good, 4 treacherous, rash, conceited, lovers of pleasure rather than lovers of God— 5 having a form of godliness but denying its power. Have nothing to do with such people.
 

derekpriester5839

Member
Member
As I haven't been out much for long rides over the past year, I figured it would be worth reading about the rides others have taken. Ms. Beard made the ride in 1984.

Elspeth.jpg
 

Strawboss

Member
Member
Interesting, I thought someone would have done that way before 1984. Let us know how the book is afterward.
 

tlr-boise

Member
Member
Here's a book nobody has mentioned so far, and I found it flat amazing: "Builders for Battle" by David O. Woodbury.

You won't find it in a library. Long out of print. You'll have to find it on Amazon and buy it. Published in 1946.

It's the story of the Pacific naval bases constructed at Pearl Harbor, Guam, Wake Island, Midway, other places, in the year or two just prior to the attack on Pearl Harbor. Before that attack, everybody knew war was coming, the Navy knew they'd need bases way out there in the Pacific, and they enlisted several big American construction companies to build them. After Pearl Harbor, Wake Island was attacked and civilian Morrison Knudson workmen were captured there after building that base, and they were P.O.W.'s for the rest of the war. Quite a story there. When I moved to Boise in 1983, there were plenty of the survivors of that battle and Japanese internment living around here.

Each story of how those civilian Americans built those bases is almost unbelievable, but the best story, imho, was how they figured out how to construct a series of ENORMOUS underground fuel storage tanks under a mountain ridge in Hawaii, at Pearl Harbor, when the Navy decided their above ground storage tanks were vulnerable to attack. The entire project was super secret, and quite an engineering challenge. It was a different world back then. All these construction projects were negotiated, set up, designed, supplied, and built at warp speed; NOTHING in this book could be done now. At least, without ten years, at least, of lawsuits and environmental impact statements. Reading this book shows you why and how we won WW II, and why we haven't won a war since then.

Other than that, Jack Reacher books are great, (and yes Lee Childs hates guns and other grubby aspects of the USA.) The Gray Man series by Mark Greaney is good. The Pike Logan books by Brad Taylor are good. Taylor is a retired Delta Force Colonel. And, of course, the best I've read, imho, is Vince Flynn.
 

Tour1

Member
Member
e-book, The 3 Body Problem, translated into english from chinese.
So far it's fairly ordinary sci-fi, plot seems familiar sort of like The Day The World Stood Still, differently of course, up to the minute technology, and a little bit of Ayn Rand mentality creeping in. I'll see where it goes in due time.
Speaking of time I like time travel plots just to see how their creator views, well, time travel. There's often a scene where the future changes because of something unexpected but possible that happens in the past.
So I was reading this thread Turnbuckles for Trailering; Is anybody interested? | Page 2 | Concours Owners Group Forum (cog-online.org) when the future changed... it was a remarkable feeling.
 
Last edited:

Strawboss

Member
Member
Tour, have you read any of Harry Turtledove's books? They are time travel but mostly alternate history with aliens involved, I know, I know, don't dismiss it, just try one, I thought his "Guns of the South" was decent book to start of his.
 

4bikes

COG#9715 AAD
Member
My next book is going to be Yeager: An Autobiography. I think this would be the 4th time. Check Yeager also has another book Press On! It’s about his hunting, fishing, and backpacking adventures. The guy lived an incredible life and accomplished a lot, and it’s amazing he lived so long considering combat and all the risk he took on. Both books fill in details you will never see in the news.
 

ron203

Southeast Area Director
Member
Tour, have you read any of Harry Turtledove's books? They are time travel but mostly alternate history with aliens involved, I know, I know, don't dismiss it, just try one, I thought his "Guns of the South" was decent book to start of his.
Interesting. Thanks for the intro.
 

Tour1

Member
Member
I looked him up... it's strange that I don't recall any Turtledove but lately I see that a lot of what I thought was widely known is really local-ish.
I think I'll notice his books next time if they are there. As a fact-check, have you heard of Asimov's Foundation series? He wrote "I, Robot" which became a Will Smith movie. Foundation speculates that the main gist of the future is predictable and it gets predicted in a big library-like place called Trantor.
 

Tour1

Member
Member
Try looking at some Arthur C. Clarke.
I don't like him since I heard he said that 90% of the human race shouldn't be living. He's like that Marvel comics double-movie villain so I wouldn't read him just for amusement. As for finding Asimov anywhere, since he expired I bet his publicist is taking some time off. His future tech was a lot like Star Wars, I think, hyperspace and androids and diplomatic situations.
 
Last edited:

Daboo

Moderator
Staff member
Member
Agreed. I thought the Foundation series was just fantastic when I read it in high school. But I just reread the first three or four books a few months ago and it seemed rather blasé now.

I just finished chapter 4 of the Book of Daniel. It seems written for today.

Chris
 

ONOBob

Member
Member
Here's a book nobody has mentioned so far, and I found it flat amazing: "Builders for Battle" by David O. Woodbury.

You won't find it in a library. Long out of print. You'll have to find it on Amazon and buy it. Published in 1946.

It's the story of the Pacific naval bases constructed at Pearl Harbor, Guam, Wake Island, Midway, other places, in the year or two just prior to the attack on Pearl Harbor. Before that attack, everybody knew war was coming, the Navy knew they'd need bases way out there in the Pacific, and they enlisted several big American construction companies to build them. After Pearl Harbor, Wake Island was attacked and civilian Morrison Knudson workmen were captured there after building that base, and they were P.O.W.'s for the rest of the war. Quite a story there. When I moved to Boise in 1983, there were plenty of the survivors of that battle and Japanese internment living around here.

Each story of how those civilian Americans built those bases is almost unbelievable, but the best story, imho, was how they figured out how to construct a series of ENORMOUS underground fuel storage tanks under a mountain ridge in Hawaii, at Pearl Harbor, when the Navy decided their above ground storage tanks were vulnerable to attack. The entire project was super secret, and quite an engineering challenge. It was a different world back then. All these construction projects were negotiated, set up, designed, supplied, and built at warp speed; NOTHING in this book could be done now. At least, without ten years, at least, of lawsuits and environmental impact statements. Reading this book shows you why and how we won WW II, and why we haven't won a war since then.

Other than that, Jack Reacher books are great, (and yes Lee Childs hates guns and other grubby aspects of the USA.) The Gray Man series by Mark Greaney is good. The Pike Logan books by Brad Taylor are good. Taylor is a retired Delta Force Colonel. And, of course, the best I've read, imho, is Vince Flynn.


Builders for Battle sounds like my kind of book. I really enjoy historical / fact based reading. You learn something real at least
Thanks

Soooo. I checked Amazon, they have one new copy. $601.00. Several used copies, around $40.00. Im gonna check my local libraries before buying one. LOL

Bob
 

Strawboss

Member
Member
"The Family Corleone" it begins in 1933 and fleshes out the "Godfather" characters before we all knew them from the film.
 

cmoore

Member
Member
"Empire of the Summer Moon" basically the rise and fall of the Comanche nation. A very good history about Texas, the response to the native Americans and the llano estacado (aka staked plains), where I lived in my youth.
 

nickrides

Scooter
Forum Subscriber
I'm reading " A Bright Shining Lie, John Paul Vann and America in Vietnam"
By Neil Sheehan
Good history lesson for me. Tragic that the US Commanders knew, clearly, as early as 1962 it was a untenable, unwinnable civil war.
Sad/ tragic for the 52,000 US lives lost.
With McNamara Secretary of Defense, former CEO of Ford Motor Company it is clear now that he fully backed it for the economic gain for US Company's suppling the war effort. After WW2, US Company's really liked those wars, no bid contracts etc etc.
Nick
2014 C-14
 

cmoore

Member
Member
I'm reading " A Bright Shining Lie, John Paul Vann and America in Vietnam"
By Neil Sheehan
Good history lesson for me. Tragic that the US Commanders knew, clearly, as early as 1962 it was a untenable, unwinnable civil war.
Sad/ tragic for the 52,000 US lives lost.
With McNamara Secretary of Defense, former CEO of Ford Motor Company it is clear now that he fully backed it for the economic gain for US Company's suppling the war effort. After WW2, US Company's really liked those wars, no bid contracts etc etc.
Nick
2014 C-14
"Hue 1968" by Mark Bowden is an excellent book about Vietnam. Bowden also wrote Black Hawk Down and Killing Pablo. LBJ was all in on the troop surge in Vietnam. Once it was said and done lots of people just wanted to forget it. I know, easier for some than others. A very bitter lesson for this country.
 

ron203

Southeast Area Director
Member
Builders for Battle sounds like my kind of book. I really enjoy historical / fact based reading. You learn something real at least
Thanks

Soooo. I checked Amazon, they have one new copy. $601.00. Several used copies, around $40.00. Im gonna check my local libraries before buying one. LOL

Bob
Sometimes you can find out of print books on abebooks.com (American Book Exchange) which is like a market place for used book resellers. All levels of condition and price.
 

Strawboss

Member
Member
"On Secret Service" by John Jakes, I read it a long time ago and wanted a Civil War fix so I'm doing it again, I don't remember most of it.
 

ron203

Southeast Area Director
Member
Just finished "Gettysburg' by Newt Gingrich and Fortschen. It's an alternative Civil war history about the immediate post Gettysburg battle that didn't happen the way it really did (Gettysburg). It was "okay" but you could tell which parts Newt wrote and which parts Fortschen wrote. That's a bad sign in a collaboration. Newt is definitely more difficult and less entertaining to read. Fortschen should've just done it alone. It's a good $2.99 Kindle book that cost $12.99 because of the two authors. Now I'm debating the next one in the series. With Fortschen, it's rarely a consideration. Thinking....

(Fortschen, not Rosone)
 
Last edited:

Strawboss

Member
Member
I put one of their books down as I just could not get into it, WAY too much strategery and technical think. It wasn't really a novel to me.
 

ron203

Southeast Area Director
Member
I put one of their books down as I just could not get into it, WAY too much strategery and technical think. It wasn't really a novel to me.
I usually finish a series if I get through the first one, but after reading the reviews and plot summaries of #2 and #3, I think I'll save my $ for a tank of gas.
 

pawbel13618

Member
Member
Some very intellectual readers here! I'm currently rereading a collection of Stephen King short stories, The Bazaar of Bad Dreams. I recently reread The Motorcycle Diaries. One nice thing about getting older is one can reread books or re-watch movies and it's almost like virgin material lol.
 

freebird6

Member
Member
"A Column of Fire", by Ken Follett, the third book of the "Kingsbridge Trilogy" now situated in 1558 follows 2 families on opposite sides when the Protestant Reformation is sweeping England and France and people are being killed because of what they believe in. Powerful stuff.
I remember in 1981 on a break from school my Father in Law said "Hey Yashew, try this book out" as he slid Pillars of the Earth across the table. Went in my then GFs room and read for 3 days straight. Prior to that I did not like much of Follet but since then I have read most of his work goiing forward. They are very easy to get lost in for days at a time.
 

Strawboss

Member
Member
"Final Flight" by Stephen Coonts, it's not really a sequel to "Flight of the Intruder" as it takes place about 15 years later with Jake Grafton flying F-14's as CAG off a carrier, but it was the next book he wrote after that. Lots of technical cockpit flying action. Written right after "Top Gun" was released, so, older stuff but still relevant to world events.
 

ron203

Southeast Area Director
Member
Okay, so I bit on the Harry Turtledove alt history for WWII where the Lizards invade Earth during the middle of the war. It’s surprisingly good and I’m starting #2 in the series .
 

MichiGlenn

Member
Member
For lent I deleted Facebook from my phone, which has become a major time suck. Started reading “The Boys in the Boat” by Daniel James Brown, about the Olympic crew team from Washington state that won Hitler’s olympics.
I may leave FB deleted.
 

Daboo

Moderator
Staff member
Member
I've been reading the Harbinger II, by Jonathan Cahn.

Fascinating book. I read the Harbinger a few years ago. This is just as good. The story revolves around a guy, Nouriel, who is given clues to solve by the Prophet. The story brings out events and prophecies about ancient Israel that have come true in America's past and now current events. I'd like to say it was just a fiction story, but when I check things, it looks like the correlations are true.

In any case, it is a good read and food for thought.

Chris
 

Strawboss

Member
Member
Ron, if you like the WWII books, you will love his "Guns of the South". Also, I'm sure you know about Follett's Knightsbridge prequel that takes place in the 800's, forget the title but I'm starting to see it at resale shops in hardback.
 

Strawboss

Member
Member
My wife just picked up a new title, "The Girl And The Bombardier" by Susan Tate Ankeny, True story of a a woman finding notes in her fathers belongings of his account of being shot down over Nazi occupied France late in WWII and taken in by a girl and her family and her quest to find those people. It's not a large book.
 

ron203

Southeast Area Director
Member
Ron, if you like the WWII books, you will love his "Guns of the South". Also, I'm sure you know about Follett's Knightsbridge prequel that takes place in the 800's, forget the title but I'm starting to see it at resale shops in hardback.
Yes, I’m liking those, thanks for the tip.
I posted about Follet’s series earlier in the thread. Those were excellent.

I like anything he writes. His Night Over Water is a single book story and is a WWII “ thriller/who done it” that’s good.
 

Daboo

Moderator
Staff member
Member
I started a new book tonight, "What is Heaven Saying". Looks interesting.

Just gotta cut the cord to the computer to start reading it, instead of what everyone is posting. :D

Chris
 
Top