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Top 10 Drop Types : Drop Prevention : Drop Recovery : What Breaks & Fixes

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Original content gathered and published by Kerry Perkins, Greg Habel and Paul Campbell - Thanks to them, they are appreciated.

Top 10 Ways we Drop our Connies
#10- Center stand tip over (3 incidents)
#9 - Going over an obstacle (3 incidents)
#8 - Backing up (3 incidents)
#7 - Putting on center stand (3 incidents)
#6 - Side stand NOT deployed (4 incidents) That's embarrassing![:eek:)]
#5 - Failure to transfer weight when slow (5 incidents)
#4 - Side stand not fully deployed (5 incidents)
#3 - Use of the front brake at very slow speeds (9 incidents)
#2 - Stopping and putting foot down on uneven surface (11 incidents)
-- and the number one cause is..... (drum roll please) --
#1 - Gravel and other slippery surfaces (15 incidents!)


Ideas on prevention
From Greg Habel Don't wait till the last second to get your feet out before a stop. Back up very slowly and make sure your feet are firmly planted. Take the Experienced Riders Course. Highly recommended. Have a second person steady the bike before putting on the center stand. Make sure you are in 1st gear when starting out.
Numerous Suggestions Install Tipover Bars or Cages
From Stuart Scott Make sure the bike is warmed up so it doesn't stall.
From Ken Brown When trailering; put the sidestand down before taking off the straps.
From Nightrider - Side stand needs to be watched carefully as it doesn't give that much of a lean and will collapse if the bike rolls forward even a little bit. I think I'll get in the habit of shutting down the engine with the kick stand while in first gear.
Humorous Tips
From Mark AKA Dr. Zorlac Jones - Construct a 6" high wooden form around the bike, say 3'x7', fill with .4 yds of concrete, wait a few days, remove the form, problem solved.
From Matt Thompson put dual tires on the rear
From COGer Robert Gently lay the bike down whenever it is not moving.
From Ken Idaho never ride the bike slower than 70.
From Patrick Morin Install training wheels in back.
From Brett Russell Have a Gorilla riding pillion. Never have to worry about not being able to pick it up after that. Good burglar protection also!


Picking Your Concours Back Up
Numerous Susggestions - Get some help, if possible. Even if you can get it back on two wheels alone, more hands lifting is safer for you and the bike.
From pfloydgad This is the technique used to pic up most bikes, even a monster Gold Wing. I have taught this in a motorcycle safety course. If on left side: Turn handlebars as if turning left, squeeze front brake lever to lock front brakes, get feet positioned so when you lean into the bike toward the front brake lever the weight of the bike and your lean create a lift angle. As bike comes up be careful not to put on other side. I know this sounds tough, but once the angle of lean is established it really does come up quite easily. Of course if you have friends with you disregard these instructions and get them to help u. Obviously if it is down on its right side repeat this process from the right. The locking of the front brakes is the key to either side up-righting. Please be careful. Ride safe, and pick-up safe.
From COGer Lawrence Osborne - How to pick up a dropped Connie: 1. Get mad...very mad 2. Make sure adrenaline is pumping at max flow 3. Grab handlebars 4. Scream your favorite obscenity as loud as you can and HEAVE 5. Walk to other side of Connie and repeat. (added from suggestion by Kevin Brown) 6. Take Pain Killer to alleviate instant pain created in spinal column. (srt4driver)


Common Drop Damage and Some Fixes
For the C10
Front foot peg brackets. Since the front foot pegs do not fold up far enough the brackets themselves tend to either break or crack. Always check these closely after a drop. www.murpskits.com carries an emergency replacement bolt that will get you by until you replace the bracket. Some carry them just in case. Murph also carries the brackets. Some folks; including myself have grind down the pivot area so that the pegs swing up much higher. See this link for instructions: http://www.delp.net/Concours/Tech/Footpeg_Mod/index.htm
Antlers Have them welded.
Mirror mount or just the fairing cracks near the mirror. Buy new or used
Replacing the mirror assembly for broken bracket (Post 93). 1) Remove the windshield. Keep track of where the screws go. 2) Remove the screw on the top of the dash. 3) Remove each upper screw in the locking cubbies. 4) Pivot the dash forward. 5) Remove the 2 bolts on the mirror bracket inside the dash. Out it comes. 6) Reverse to put it back together with the new one (Murph has them).
Scratches on the bags Sand them out.
Cracked fairing repair tip (pjbaldes) I used some of that foil tape used for hvac (you know air conditioners etc) duct sealing to hold together some parts while the epoxy was setting up. You can sort of mold it like tin foil that's sticky on one side. it has some structure to keep cantankerous pieces of plastic where you want them while it sets up. I put a few strips in my bag just in case I need to tape something tapered or beveled together.

For the C14
Nub on the footpeg Replace the footpeg
Various Fairing parts Replace or repair as needed
Bag Cover Replace or repair as needed
Shaft Cap scraped Replace or repair as needed



Original content gathered and published by Kerry Perkins, Greg Habel and Paul Campbell - Thanks to them, they are appreciated.
 
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