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Michelin Pilot Road 5 GT or Regular Road 5?

I Feel Fizzy

Member
Member
I put a set of Michelin Pilot Road 5 GT's on my 2018 Concours this summer, planning for a cross-country trip which did not happen due to shingles.

I do my own tires, and my question is this: The GT's were a bear to mount! Has anyone found found it any easier to mount the regular Pilot Road 5s compared to the GTs? Second question is: do we really need the recommended GTs, or will the regular Pilot Roads do as well? I have an FZ1 and I love the Metzler Sportec M9s on that. Great wet grip too. But this is a much different bike.

I don't ride two-up and usually only run a top case and tank bag, no side bags. I definitely ride on the sporty side of things, and prefer grip (in the rain too) and performance over mileage. I figure changing tires is relatively cheap insurance. I bought the GTs because of the planned trip, which would have worn them out. I still plan on taking some trips (solo) with loaded up bags. I just hate to struggle with those GTs if I don't need them.

Looking forward to your experiences with them.

Craig
 

2andblue

Member
Member
I put a set of Michelin Pilot Road 5 GT's on my 2018 Concours this summer, planning for a cross-country trip which did not happen due to shingles.

I do my own tires, and my question is this: The GT's were a bear to mount! Has anyone found found it any easier to mount the regular Pilot Road 5s compared to the GTs? Second question is: do we really need the recommended GTs, or will the regular Pilot Roads do as well? I have an FZ1 and I love the Metzler Sportec M9s on that. Great wet grip too. But this is a much different bike.

I don't ride two-up and usually only run a top case and tank bag, no side bags. I definitely ride on the sporty side of things, and prefer grip (in the rain too) and performance over mileage. I figure changing tires is relatively cheap insurance. I bought the GTs because of the planned trip, which would have worn them out. I still plan on taking some trips (solo) with loaded up bags. I just hate to struggle with those GTs if I don't need them.

Looking forward to your experiences with them.

Craig
Craig I know some were running the non GT 5’s because they wanted a change and GT’s release date was a few months behind the regular - I don’t recall anyone mentioning anything negative.

She is a big girl though and does catch a lot of wind so it’s not just the weight.

I would stay on the GT side of things, but I also like to push the machine quite a bit and don’t need a carcass to let loose, however unlikely that is…. Not to mention the roads in our area are terrible, another reason to have a more fortified sidewall. I have zero doubt some of the potholes we’ve hit here would have torn a lesser tire apart.

Wayne, Carol & Blue
 

Road Runner

SE USA - AAD
Member
Craig I know some were running the non GT 5’s because they wanted a change and GT’s release date was a few months behind the regular - I don’t recall anyone mentioning anything negative.

She is a big girl though and does catch a lot of wind so it’s not just the weight.

I would stay on the GT side of things, but I also like to push the machine quite a bit and don’t need a carcass to let loose, however unlikely that is…. Not to mention the roads in our area are terrible, another reason to have a more fortified sidewall. I have zero doubt some of the potholes we’ve hit here would have torn a lesser tire apart.

Wayne, Carol & Blue
What "2andblue" said re: GT. +1

I recently went away from the Pirelli Angel GTs, in favor of the Michelin Road 5 GT. Over 2 years I have several punctures on relatively new Pirelli tires that co$t$ me, so I am hoping the Michelins are more durable. I had them in the past ...
 

kzz1king

Member
Member
What "2andblue" said re: GT. +1

I recently went away from the Pirelli Angel GTs, in favor of the Michelin Road 5 GT. Over 2 years I have several punctures on relatively new Pirelli tires that co$t$ me, so I am hoping the Michelins are more durable. I had them in the past ...
I tried the Angels once. At about 5000 miles I got 2 rock punctures on my gravel road. Didn't try them again.
 

TireguyfromMA

Member
Member
What part of getting the GT's on your wheel did you have the most trouble with? I've been doing my own tires for 11 years now, have GT's on my 2010 and love em. There might be other tires that perform better on the track or dry roads but when the roads get wet these are the best. You might not have lube in all the right spots causing the rubber to hang up or get stuck to the wheel. Another problem is not getting the beads of the tire to collapse into the drop center of the wheel enough to get those last few inches of tire bead over the edge of the wheel. Once in awhile I have to use the big IRWIN pistol clamps around the 6 o'clock position of the tire to get it to collapse into the drop center while I'm getting the last few inches of the bead from say 10 to 1 o'clock position over the wheel. If the tire bead stays at the edge of the wheel you will have a really hard time getting the rest of the tire on the wheel.
 

I Feel Fizzy

Member
Member
Them damn shingle shots huuurrtt’
I guess I'll find out soon - I had to wait six-months after they cleared up to get the shot.
Craig I know some were running the non GT 5’s because they wanted a change and GT’s release date was a few months behind the regular - I don’t recall anyone mentioning anything negative.

She is a big girl though and does catch a lot of wind so it’s not just the weight.

I would stay on the GT side of things, but I also like to push the machine quite a bit and don’t need a carcass to let loose, however unlikely that is…. Not to mention the roads in our area are terrible, another reason to have a more fortified sidewall. I have zero doubt some of the potholes we’ve hit here would have torn a lesser tire apart.

Wayne, Carol & Blue
Yeah, that's what I figured. Just a real battle spooning them on!
 

I Feel Fizzy

Member
Member
What part of getting the GT's on your wheel did you have the most trouble with? I've been doing my own tires for 11 years now, have GT's on my 2010 and love em. There might be other tires that perform better on the track or dry roads but when the roads get wet these are the best. You might not have lube in all the right spots causing the rubber to hang up or get stuck to the wheel. Another problem is not getting the beads of the tire to collapse into the drop center of the wheel enough to get those last few inches of tire bead over the edge of the wheel. Once in awhile I have to use the big IRWIN pistol clamps around the 6 o'clock position of the tire to get it to collapse into the drop center while I'm getting the last few inches of the bead from say 10 to 1 o'clock position over the wheel. If the tire bead stays at the edge of the wheel you will have a really hard time getting the rest of the tire on the wheel.
Getting that last bit onto the rim. I do use a No-Mar tire iron, and have the 'Yellow Thing' and a 3 clamps to hold the tire in the center of the rim - they help a LOT! I also use the No-Mar lube, which is great. The Metzler Sprotec M Series is a piece of cake, but it's a softer, sporty tire. I have a Harbor Freight changer though - some day I hope to upgrade to a No-Mar. I've been doing my own tires for about 20 years. I bought an extra set of RIMS and rotors for my FZ1 so I can put a fresh set on for doing a track day or the Dragon, and then just swap out for my commuting tires. Haven't done that with the Connie yet.
 

I Feel Fizzy

Member
Member
What "2andblue" said re: GT. +1

I recently went away from the Pirelli Angel GTs, in favor of the Michelin Road 5 GT. Over 2 years I have several punctures on relatively new Pirelli tires that co$t$ me, so I am hoping the Michelins are more durable. I had them in the past ...
Good to know. I like the way the Michelins handle.
 

kzz1king

Member
Member
Getting that last bit onto the rim. I do use a No-Mar tire iron, and have the 'Yellow Thing' and a 3 clamps to hold the tire in the center of the rim - they help a LOT! I also use the No-Mar lube, which is great. The Metzler Sprotec M Series is a piece of cake, but it's a softer, sporty tire. I have a Harbor Freight changer though - some day I hope to upgrade to a No-Mar. I've been doing my own tires for about 20 years. I bought an extra set of RIMS and rotors for my FZ1 so I can put a fresh set on for doing a track day or the Dragon, and then just swap out for my commuting tires. Haven't done that with the Connie yet.
I have I an old freezer converted to a meat smoker. I started putting my tires in it and warming them up . Helps a bunch. Prior to that I had times when I couldn't get that last bit over. I run my heat gun back and forth a few times and then it goes.
Tire warmers for the track would be great!
 

2andblue

Member
Member
I have I an old freezer converted to a meat smoker. I started putting my tires in it and warming them up . Helps a bunch. Prior to that I had times when I couldn't get that last bit over. I run my heat gun back and forth a few times and then it goes.
Tire warmers for the track would be great!
A smoker huh? So when you roast the tires in the smoker do they come out smelling good?

That'd be something - ripping on the tires the first few times and smelling smoked food! :p

Great idea though!
 

I Feel Fizzy

Member
Member
I have I an old freezer converted to a meat smoker. I started putting my tires in it and warming them up . Helps a bunch. Prior to that I had times when I couldn't get that last bit over. I run my heat gun back and forth a few times and then it goes.
Tire warmers for the track would be great!
Now there's an idea, thanks! I do have a heat gun I could use on them. I never thought about that. Kind of like the idea of putting bearings in the freezer and heating where the bearings go to drop them in.
 

kzz1king

Member
Member
I live in Houston.
I just set them out in the sun before I mount them.
The biggest issue then is touching them as their so hot!

& If it's too cold, I wait a few days before I do it.

Ride safe, Ted
I tried the sun. Tried putting them in the back window of the car. It gets hot here in the summer but I never got the tires so hot I couldn't touch them. I lived in the Victoria area for a few years. My buddy, another Yankee transplant, and I were the only people that rode during the winter months. Of course we had to. Didn't own a car then. Sucked during the fog. But I digress. Heat helps. I cook mine to about 160
 

red fox

Member
Member
I just hate to struggle with those GTs if I don't need them.
Craig
Well, I'd run what on the bike myself. But if you do swap them for the non-GT version I'd suggest increasing the pressure full 2 or 3 psi over what the GT tires were set to.
 

connie_rider

Member
Member
I tried the sun. Tried putting them in the back window of the car. It gets hot here in the summer but I never got the tires so hot I couldn't touch them. I lived in the Victoria area for a few years. My buddy, another Yankee transplant, and I were the only people that rode during the winter months. Of course we had to. Didn't own a car then. Sucked during the fog. But I digress. Heat helps. I cook mine to about 160
For clarity;
I'm from Houston "TeXaS".
So, there is a "slight chance" that I "may have" exaggerated "just a little". 🤠

Ride safe, Ted
 
Last edited:

kzz1king

Member
Member
One in the oven😃
 

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rogracer

Member
Member
For the first 3 versions of the Roads there was no such thing as the "GT" version and many folks (including myself) ran them without issue. The GT version has the same load rating as the regular version so load capacity isn't really the reason to switch to the GTs. Personally, I've been running non GT Michelins for 10 years and have been more than happy with them (I also mount them myself) and will likely stick with em because I see no reason to change based on my experience. YMMV.
 

I Feel Fizzy

Member
Member
For the first 3 versions of the Roads there was no such thing as the "GT" version and many folks (including myself) ran them without issue. The GT version has the same load rating as the regular version so load capacity isn't really the reason to switch to the GTs. Personally, I've been running non GT Michelins for 10 years and have been more than happy with them (I also mount them myself) and will likely stick with em because I see no reason to change based on my experience. YMMV.
Thanks for your input. Now you have me considering the non-GTs. Guess I might have to try them myself to find out!
 

I Feel Fizzy

Member
Member
For the first 3 versions of the Roads there was no such thing as the "GT" version and many folks (including myself) ran them without issue. The GT version has the same load rating as the regular version so load capacity isn't really the reason to switch to the GTs. Personally, I've been running non GT Michelins for 10 years and have been more than happy with them (I also mount them myself) and will likely stick with em because I see no reason to change based on my experience. YMMV.
I guess you never mounted the GTs to compare then, correct?
 

rogracer

Member
Member
You are correct...I have no experience with mounting any GTs so can't comment on the difficulty. I've mounted "regular" Road 2s, 3s, 4s, and 5s without any problems though.
 

laker9142

Member
Member
I guess you never mounted the GTs to compare then, correct?
I've mounted many sets 2s, 3s, one 4, two regular 5s and two 5gts. My opinion is 2,3, and 4 are all about the same and easy to mount. The regular 5 was easier (like a wet dishrag). The gt was only slightly more difficult than the 2,3,4 but at least it had a little backbone. The 5 regular was not confidence inspiring when the tread was almost gone, both on the bike and especially dismounted. There just wasn't much left to be holding up a big powerful motorcycle. But as far as ease of mounting, all the Michelins are very easy compared to some others.
 

I Feel Fizzy

Member
Member
I've mounted many sets 2s, 3s, one 4, two regular 5s and two 5gts. My opinion is 2,3, and 4 are all about the same and easy to mount. The regular 5 was easier (like a wet dishrag). The gt was only slightly more difficult than the 2,3,4 but at least it had a little backbone. The 5 regular was not confidence inspiring when the tread was almost gone, both on the bike and especially dismounted. There just wasn't much left to be holding up a big powerful motorcycle. But as far as ease of mounting, all the Michelins are very easy compared to some others.
I like that the Michelins don't have a light spot dot like the Metzlers. They say it's because their manufacturing process is so precise. I thought it was just cutting corners, but it seems like it's true - they didn't need much weight to balance.
 
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