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Best switched power source for a C10

jefferim

Bicycle
I'm adding a combo USB/12V DC cigarette lighter outlet to my C10. I'm wondering the best way to run switched power to this accessory so that it's automatically turned off when the bike is off. For my other bike I used taillights. I'd love to hear advice on what works best for this purpose.

From reading the manual it sounds like there are two pairs of accessory wiring options, but they are both directly wired to the battery. I want to be sure that if I accidentally leave my phone or GPS plugged in it won't drain the battery.

For reference, I'm installing this one if it fits:
https://smile.amazon.com/dp/B0875K5643/ref=cm_sw_r_sms_apa_i_0Q2YEb1ZFWWZH

I'm thinking that this would be great located inside the left storage pocket in the fairing. When something needs to charge it can go in the fairing pocket or run a cord out to a device.

All advice on how to accomplish this goal without draining my battery would be greatly appreciated.

Thank you
 

Stasch

Member
Member
I'm wondering the best way to run switched power to this accessory so that it's automatically turned off when the bike is off. For my other bike I used taillights. I'd love to hear advice on what works best for this purpose.

To have switched power that goes on / off with the key, you will need to install a relay. 

  • The relay activation connection tang can tap into a variety of places.  I chose the left running light in the main fairing. 
  • The relay's Power / Ground connections can tap directly to the battery, or better yet, an auxiliary fusebox to allow several accessory circuits with fuses to protect things.
  • If you don't use an auxiliary fusebox, you can put an inline fuse(s) to your accessory(s).
  • RELAY Wiring Diagram



From reading the manual it sounds like there are two pairs of accessory wiring options, but they are both directly wired to the battery. I want to be sure that if I leave my phone or GPS plugged in end of draining by bf

Both these connections are hot all the time.  They do not switch off with the key.

 

GeorgeRYoung

Guest
Guest
Pin 8 on the J-Box.
 

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rwulf

Member
Member
That's correct, pin #8 will work. Should be a blue wire. Or I believe I used
the brown out of the innition switch. Proably the lead connected to pin #8
might be the best to use.
 

jefferim

Bicycle
So pardon me if this is a dumb question.. But do I need to use a relay AND tap into pin 8? Or can I just use pin 8 as a hot wire that is activated by the ignition?

I'm not powering anything serious like heated grips or gear.. basically charging a phone and maybe a GPS concurrently.

Is this what I need? http://www.amotostuff.com/product/02450.html

Thanks!
Mike

 

lrbuck

Street Cruiser
Member
Industry Vendor
As someone who deals with J-boxes with cooked relays, I recommend that none of the bikes wiring be used to power accessories. If you will do what several others have suggested using a relay and fuse block, you won't have any issues. You will also have the ability to add additional items safely to the fuse block. The side benefit of using this setup is your accessories will be "switched" and you will have no worries about leaving the key on and draining the battery  Below is a link on how to do this modification.

[/url]http://advrider.com/index.php?threads/piaa-510-installation-tips.328227/

HTH
 

rwulf

Member
Member
Larry is right. The switch you asked about will work. A simple auto relay will
be a bit cheaper.
 

jefferim

Bicycle
Alright, I've bought all of these parts and I figure with your advice I should be able to make this all work!

 

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jefferim

Bicycle
I'm bringing this thread to a conclusion with some details in case anyone as challenged as me comes upon this question. I always hate when I find a thread with the question but it hangs out unresolved, so here is how this one ended..

This is why this forum is so great. My original plan was to get a scotch lock and tap into the running lights. Pretty basic and not the safest solution. After throwing it to the group, I now know how to install a relay switch, much more about the electric on the bike, and have a safer and more elegant system (that also won't short out my lights and kill me in the dark). I'll also be going back and fixing the wiring on my 2017 Triumph.

After the advice of the group, I purchased the following from the local auto parts store. Cost about $35 all together.
- 30 AMP 12 Volt 4 Pin Relay (Dorman brand, $9)
- 14 AWG auto electric wire
- Female quick disconnects .250"
- Bullet connectors (male and female pack for the inline fuse)
- Inline fuse holder
- 15 Amp inline fuse
- Two ring terminals to attach to the battery

I mounted the relay by the j box and ran the wires per the diagram posted by Stasch. The .250" female quick disconnects are the size used throughout the setup for both the relay and to attach to pin 8 to activate the relay. Setup was pretty darn easy. I added an inline fuse for the run to the accessories.

I need to safely stash the wires, but the end product is attached. Will look nicer once tucked away. Let me know if anyone has a way this could have been improved upon.

I'll be running this to a dual outlet with 2 USB and one cigarette lighter. Should be great for the usual GPS/phone.

Thanks everyone for pointing me in the right direction.
 

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Stasch

Member
Member
I would suggest a lower rated fuse for your accessory ports if used for low voltage electronic accessories like phones, GPS etc.

15A is what I use for heated gear and a pair of 55W running lights.

1A is what I use inline for GPS.

 

boomer

Crotch Rocket
Forum Subscriber
if you plan on using the connector to hook up a battery maintainer, then 15A inline is fine.
Otherwise, set the fuse to slightly more than the heaviest draw you will use it with (normally an electric tyre pump).

I always use insulated connectors as tape can wear through unless you wrap several layers around it.
I also always use red wire for +12v, black wire for earth/common/-ive, and yellow or blue for switched or signal wires.
Finally, try to use the connectors such that any loose hanging wire, once disconnected, is not going to short to the chassis or engine and blow that fuse.  :great:
This is where using insulated receptacles like these really helps.
https://www.ebay.co.uk/itm/FULLY-INSULATED-SPADE-ELECTRICAL-TERMINALS-RED-BLUE-YELLOW-WIRE-CRIMP-CONNECTORS/274076281622?
 

bowtie39

Member
Member
Boomer said:
if you plan on using the connector to hook up a battery maintainer, then 15A inline is fine.
Otherwise, set the fuse to slightly more than the heaviest draw you will use it with (normally an electric tyre pump).

I always use insulated connectors as tape can wear through unless you wrap several layers around it.
I also always use red wire for +12v, black wire for earth/common/-ive, and yellow or blue for switched or signal wires.
Finally, try to use the connectors such that any loose hanging wire, once disconnected, is not going to short to the chassis or engine and blow that fuse.  :great:
This is where using insulated receptacles like these really helps.
https://www.ebay.co.uk/itm/FULLY-INSULATED-SPADE-ELECTRICAL-TERMINALS-RED-BLUE-YELLOW-WIRE-CRIMP-CONNECTORS/274076281622?
I have one but don't like it as it doesn't make nice crimps on the insulated connectors.  What tool might be suggested?

Thanks so much
 

jefferim

Bicycle
Thanks for all the great suggestions. The USB and cigarette port acessory came with an online fuse at a more appropriate smaller amperage so that was a nice perk. I'm saving my 15A online fuse for another day.

Yeah, the all red wire is pure laziness. I actually studied electrical engineering in college if you can believe it, but my brain was, uh, not optimized for retention back then.

Insulated connectors is a great suggestion and a few bucks well spent. I'm going to get me some.

I added a separate circuit for a 10W solar trickle charger. I got the Battery Tender solar controller so it doesn't kill the battery. It's all hooked up but I haven't taken it out of the garage to get sunshine yet. Looking forward to testing it. They are clever devices.
Thanks for checking it out and suggesting improvements.
 

boomer

Crotch Rocket
Forum Subscriber
The ratchet crimp tool I use is similar to this and does a double crimp.
Has slots for red, blue, and yellow crimp terminals.
2d944f54-7f15-40ff-a1a7-c47752eabe77.__CR0,0,300,300_PT0_SX300_V1___.jpg


If you are using one of the cheaper non-ratchet single crimp tools, then it may not hold very well.
You can also get solder on connectors that have an insulated cover that slips over the connector.
 
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