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Ryans take on tire plugging options

TireguyfromMA

Member
Member
I've probably changed a couple hundred tires in the last ten years that were repaired with rope string that had been installed a year or two before. The customer wanted the tire changed because it didn't have much tread left or it was bald. They do work good if they a fresh when installed. Sometimes people will install rope that has gone hard and stale, those tend to leak. I still fee better with a the plug and patch repair that requires removal of the tirere am the hole out and then clan the spot where the patch is going to be applied. Put some glue on the stem and pull it through the hole. Most shops around herr will not fix a flat with the top plug. They willl only fix with the patch and plug.
 

gsun

COG# 9127 CDA# 560
Member
I've probably changed a couple hundred tires in the last ten years that were repaired with rope string that had been installed a year or two before. The customer wanted the tire changed because it didn't have much tread left or it was bald. They do work good if they a fresh when installed. Sometimes people will install rope that has gone hard and stale, those tend to leak. I still fee better with a the plug and patch repair that requires removal of the tirere am the hole out and then clan the spot where the patch is going to be applied. Put some glue on the stem and pull it through the hole. Most shops around herr will not fix a flat with the top plug. They willl only fix with the patch and plug.
That's good to know. I'm going to toss my plugs and get new ones. Every year would probably be good. They are cheap.
 

Scary Harry

Fear is not boring. COG# 4090
Member
Rope plugs always got me home.
I always keep several small tubes of rubber cement on hand as it makes a good lubricant and sealer for the plugs.
Once the tube of cement is opened, there is no way to keep it from drying out, so I throw it out after the repair.
 

nickrides

Scooter
Forum Subscriber
I agree the plug and patch is the best, kinda hard to get that done on the side of the road thou as the suns sets, which is what happened to my riding partner in Green River Ut last Oct.
I timed it from when I turned off my bike and opened my kit. 15 minutes to find the roofing nail, pull it out, rasp it, rope plug it and reinflate it and saddle up and get rolling. Not bad. Sun dipped below the horizon as I put it 1st gear.
Nick
2014 C-14
 

red fox

Member
Member
... rope string ... They do work good if they a fresh when installed. Sometimes people will install rope that has gone hard and stale,
OK, time to get rid of that gummy worm rope patch kit I transferred from my FJR, about 7 yrs (?) ago. I noticed that once I got a portable air compressor to carry, I stopped getting flats, although my friends still did/do on occasion.
 

nickrides

Scooter
Forum Subscriber
What is with the tubes of rubber cement drying Out? I've opened them used some and carefully put the cap back on tight.
6 months later theres nothing there??
Somebody somewhere is living on a luxury yacht making money off all of us.
Nick
2014 C-14
 

kzz1king

Member
Member
What is with the tubes of rubber cement drying Out? I've opened them used some and carefully put the cap back on tight.
6 months later theres nothing there??
Somebody somewhere is living on a luxury yacht making money off all of us.
Nick
2014 C-14
They must get the recipe from the guys who make the plumbing cement. I even trying sealing the cans in Ziploc bag sand i still goes to heck.Last can I bought was half shot when I got it and these are not single use size.
 

Daboo

Moderator
Staff member
Member
I like Ryan's videos too. I thought he could've done a better job on the test than he did. It didn't make sense that he based his results on the one test, and that test I thought was not representative to real life on pavement. It seemed more applicable to off-road riding.

If my tire is fully inflated after the repair, the inner pressure will make it feel like a rock. The Stop-N-Go mushroom plug should be pushed up tight on the inner wall of the tire. If you ride over a rock in exactly the same place, it doesn't seem like there is much chance you'll be able to force the plug out of the hole. I could see it happening, but only if the tire is already deflated enough to push on a tire tread that has some give.

It did make me decide to buy a different tire repair kit. I have the Stop-N-Go kit now, but when I did a repair on my last tire, I finally resorted to using a drill to get the hole large enough to get the thick mushroom plug in. The puncture was tiny...but leaked a lot. I would've used Slime or Ride-On, but I had put balance beads in there, and those don't work well with the beads.

So...I ended up buying the DynaPlug kit. I thought about the bacon strips, but those would require a hole larger than the DynaPlug will work on. In fact, the size of hole the bacon strips work on, is about what the mushroom plugs will work on. I wanted something that would work well with the smaller holes. And when I found that you can put several of the DynaPlug plugs into the puncture site, that sold me too.

Chris
 

Scary Harry

Fear is not boring. COG# 4090
Member
What is with the tubes of rubber cement drying Out? I've opened them used some and carefully put the cap back on tight.
6 months later theres nothing there??
Somebody somewhere is living on a luxury yacht making money off all of us.
Nick
2014 C-14
The caps crack and leak bad over time.
Too tight and they crack.
Too lose and they dry up.

I've tried bagging them up and other ways to reseal them, but have given up. It's easier to buy several small tubes.

It's the same problem with super glue. Smaller unopened tubes last longer than one large opened tube.
 
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