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Small turns on the C14

robertv

robzilla
Member
Found this recent YT vid teaching how to not fear dropping a heavy moto such as a C14 when making sharp turns!!



Very useful and good reminder on the clutch friction zone. But also turning the head and adjusting the body weight over.
 

pmackentepe2976

Papawhiskey
Member
Greg Widmar(Fast Eddie/Motojitsu guy) is always reminding us to "Shut up and practice" . First ride on my Connie was a 2 up test ride with my wife on back to a nearby parking lot to explore low speed turns, friction zone, and hard braking. Then I rode solo home. Second ride was to a parking lot to practice drills to explore new bike limits. He has some excellent advice for new or returning riders.
 

S Smith

Northeast Area Director
Member
Many of the techniques presented in this video to perform slow speed, tight turns have been presented in MSF courses for decades. I have instructed beginner and experienced riders to learn and improve this skill. The key points are
  • HEAD TURN - Riders must use visual directional control by turning their head and looking where they want to go. This means looking toward the exit point, which for these type of turns is behind, like a u-turn.
  • THROTTLE/CLUTCH COORDINATION - Do not coast; keep some power applied to the rear wheel at all times. Modulate power using the clutch. (aka Friction Zone) while learning, some rear brake can help control speed. Keep hands off front brake performing this technique.
  • BODY POSITION - Counterweighting is a necessity performing this technique on a Concours
  • CONFIDENCE AND PRACTICE - Start out making larger radius turns and not dabbing feet down. Then work on tightening up the turns.
The size of the MSF box for the ERC is 60 ft long by 28ft and 24ft widths. The 24ft is the evaluation width. The beginner course uses 20ft width for evaluation. A skilled C10 and C14 rider can demonstrate it is possible to perform a u-turn in the 20ft width.

As with any motor skills development… golf, tennis, skiing, motorcycling... it helps to have a professional observe and coach skill development and improvement. Taking a MSF ERC or other parking lot type course helps riders build the skills and confidence needed to perform this technique. Then practice, practice, practice.

A technique shown in the video I disagree with is using anything less than 4 fingers on the brake for street use. While less than 4 fingers will slow the bike, all 4 provide the strength needed for the progressive squeeze needed for threshold braking. When using less than 4 fingers the other fingers will be blocking the brake lever from being squeezed all the way in when needed for threshold braking at street speeds. Using 4 fingers all the time develops a habit that becomes instinct. When faced with an emergent situation, we perform the technique that we generally use.
 
Last edited:

Road Runner

SE USA - AAD
Member
Found this recent YT vid teaching how to not fear dropping a heavy moto such as a C14 when making sharp turns!!



Very useful and good reminder on the clutch friction zone. But also turning the head and adjusting the body weight over.
Thanks for the reminder. Always good to keep the skills fresh/current ...
 

Road Runner

SE USA - AAD
Member
Many of the techniques presented in this video to perform slow speed, tight turns have been presented in MSF courses for decades. I have instructed beginner and experienced riders to learn and improve this skill. The key points are
  • HEAD TURN - Riders must use visual directional control by turning their head and looking where they want to go. This means looking toward the exit point, which for these type of turns is behind, like a u-turn.
  • THROTTLE/CLUTCH COORDINATION - Do not coast; keep some power applied to the rear wheel at all times. Modulate power using the clutch. (aka Friction Zone) while learning, some rear brake can help control speed. Keep hands off front brake performing this technique.
  • BODY POSITION - Counterweighting is a necessity performing this technique on a Concours
  • CONFIDENCE AND PRACTICE - Start out making larger radius turns and not dabbing feet down. Then work on tightening up the turns.
The size of the MSF box for the ERC is 60 ft long by 28ft and 24ft widths. The 24ft is the evaluation width. The beginner course uses 20ft width for evaluation. A skilled C10 and C14 rider can demonstrate it is possible to perform a u-turn in the 20ft width.

As with any motor skills development… golf, tennis, skiing, motorcycling... it helps to have a professional observe and coach skill development and improvement. Taking a MSF ERC or other parking lot type course helps riders build the skills and confidence needed to perform this technique. Then practice, practice, practice.

A technique shown in the video I disagree with is using anything less than 4 fingers on the brake for street use. While less than 4 fingers will slow the bike, all 4 provide the strength needed for the progressive squeeze needed for threshold braking. When using less than 4 fingers the other fingers will be blocking the brake lever from being squeezed all the way in when needed for threshold braking at street speeds. Using 4 fingers all the time develops a habit that becomes instinct. When faced with an emergent situation, we perform the technique that we generally use.
Thank Steve!
 
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